Friday, 31 August 2012

Lighthouse at North Rustico

Lighthouse at North Rustico, Prince Edward Island, built in 1876. I cleaned up the photo by removing the overhead wires. Denis� and I spent a couple of days touring PEI in July?a terrific place to visit, by the way.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/JdxQe4kZUms/lighthouse-at-north-rustico.html

nature photography

Cool Stuff

Image Thumbnail
After clear overnight a slight ground frost greeted us at Rawcliffe this morning, and with the air temperature showing just 5 degrees Will and I donned extra clothes as we set to in erecting a few nets.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/KfE9ZvftSt8/cool-stuff.html

photography composition

Staying Cool

A brown bear cools off by laying in the water this past June, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. This morning I’m heading back to Lake Clark National Park for a week to lead another bear tour – can’t wait to get back!

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/9ZAI3yx7KAE/staying-cool

3d photography

Oh, how I love my birds

In my last post, I mentioned how Carolina Wrens are the apple of my eye as far as species that dine at my feeders in winter go(or any time of year, really). If a weekend of counting for Project FeederWatch goes by with a goose egg on my list next to "CAWR"* (the 4-letter shorthand, known as bander's code or alpha code, for CArolina WRen), it makes me sad. I worry.

This weekend I was sitting at the dining room table having a late breakfast, and I wondered out loud if "my" wrens were okay, because I had not yet heard a peep from them or seen them. Oftentimes they are one of the first birds I hear in the morning, so that was why I was a little concerned. Not to worry, though. As soon I finished posing the question to my bowl of cereal, up popped a wren onto the railing and right into the bowl that holds the bird dough.

It's when things like this happen that I can't help but wonder if there is some kind of connection between myself and the birds. I mean, come on! Wonder about the bird and then it shows up immediately thereafter, as if conjured?!

Don't worry, Heather - we are here and we are fine. Now, if you don't mind, I'm just going to sit in the food.

There were actually 2 of them sitting in here at one point, but I wasn't fast enough with the camera to get a shot of that. In total, there were 3 Carolina Wrens at my feeders at one time this weekend, as was the case last weekend. I had 3 of them at one time in early December, too. This is remarkable because this is the first year in 7 years of counting for FeederWatch that I've ever seen 3 Carolina Wrens at once at my feeders.

Contemplating his/her next bite?

I also enjoy the woodpeckers, and we get three species of them reliably: Downy, Hairy, and Red-bellied. The Downies seem to be the most tame of the three, readily coming in to the suet feeders even if I'm standing right next to them. This sweet little female Downy Woodpecker looks like she just landed, what with the little spray of snow under her tail.

Tra-la-la, minding her own business, making sure I'm getting her good side...

... then this feisty fella shows up. Doesn't he look MAD?! His little head feathers are all puffed up, full of 'tude.

Here's a look at his puffed up mane from the back:

And even though he's chased the female away by now, his bravado continues:

Oh wait, never mind. It's all cool. No problems here, lady.

Lemme jus' grab a big ol' hunk o' dough...

And get on outta here!

I soooo love this shot, caught serendipitously by depressing the shutter at just the right time, of course. It almost has the feel of a raptor caught in flight rather than a woodpecker.

Yes, friends, these are just a few examples of why I love my birds. They are wonderful in every way.

*Okay, regarding the alpha code for Carolina Wren... CAWR isn't technically correct, because that abbreviation could also refer to 2 other wren species in the United States: CActus WRen and CAnyon WRen. The correct bander's code for each of these species is as follows: CACW (Cactus Wren), CARW (Carolina), and CANW (Canyon). I use CAWR for my wren, though, because the chances of me encountering either of the other 2 species, which live out west, is pretty remote at my feeders. Besides, it's shorthand that's supposed to be easy for ME to read. But I digress.

Source: http://heather-heatherofthehills.blogspot.com/2012/02/oh-how-i-love-my-birds.html

photography forum

On Assignment: Greg Funnell Photographs Joe Wright


You have a typical hotel room, which you will gain access to an hour before the shoot. You will have a total of 20 minutes with your celebrity subject, who will arrive in God only knows what mood and/or disposition. Go.

That's pretty much the setup for London photographer Greg Funnell's shoot of movie director Joe Wright. Think about what you would do for a moment, and then continue reading to see how Greg handled this exact assignment for Time Out London. Read more �

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/07/on-assignment-greg-funnell-photographs.html

photography magazine subscription

Want. This. Light.



So, here's a light source you don't see every day. Dunno know who makes it, or even if it is store-bought or DIY. But it's pretty freakin' cool.

The navel gazing in the Flickr group over what these giant light sticks might be has devolved into a discussion of blow-up lawn ornaments, natch. But Strobist reader Jonathan Camere of Miami, FL (and a bit of a car photographer himself) chimed in with a link to the video.

Lotsa cool stuff in here. The camera (PhaseOne back on a Contax body) is physically joined, offset, to the car to get perfect pans over time exposures. Thus the need for continuous lighting.

Anyone knows anything about those mods, hit us in the comments.

Oh, and let them be cheap please. Nope. Here they are.

-30-

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/08/want-this-light.html

photography course london

Bubble Net Feeding Humpbacks

Humpback whales bubble net feeding, Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska. I’m back from my Kenai Fjords National Park photo tour.� The bad news, we had pretty bad weather – well, really bad – it rained the whole time and clouds and fog obstructed what is normally an amazing view.� Cold and wet seems to be [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/3tz_cBHa_iY/bubble-net-feeding-humpbacks

photography gifts

Bird of the Week ? Week 132 ? Black-chested prinia

title=
Although it is a near-endemic within the southern African region, the delightful Black-chested prinia is quite common within the region. A small bird, with a length of approximately 14 cm, they have pale brown upper parts; white chin and throat; and pale yellow under parts. The tail is long and graduated; eyes are brown; legs [...]

Source: http://www.wilkinsonsworld.com/2012/08/bird-of-the-week-week-132-black-chested-prinia/

wildlife photography uk

Thursday, 30 August 2012

Judge a Photographer By His Book Covers

Photography: Zach Cordner Zach Cordner decided that he needed to look like a wooly mammoth. A large beard wasn?t a requirement of the job but flying up to Wasilla to photograph Levi Johnston, the father of Sarah Palin?s grandchild, was going to mean spending a couple of days trekking through cold Alaskan woods shooting the [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/Oj2QnvK53jo/judge-a-photographer-by-his-book-covers

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Brown Bear Reflection

A brown bear reflection in sunrise light, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. This is a brown bear searching for clams at sunrise earlier this month.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/CdCZgMppSN8/brown-bear-reflection-2

african wildlife photography

Brown Bear Sunrise

A Brown Bear appears to be looking at the rising sun as it searches for clams, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. Just got back from leading another bear photo tour to Lake Clark National Park.� We had an awesome time!� Lots of bears including three spring cubs!� And to top it off, a whole week [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/Oi1BFxiY2sM/brown-bear-sunrise

portrait photographers

Mute Swans

The Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) is a species of swan that is an introduced species in North America, including Ontario. As its name ?mute? implies, it is less vocal than other swan species.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/3xpRSxEV7aE/mute-swans.html

photography competitions uk

Making Money with Instagram

Photography: Anthony Danielle Instagram made Anthony Danielle a professional photographer. The 25-year-old New Yorker and entrepreneur went pro within eighteen months of opening an Instagram account. He now has more than 180,000 followers on the mobile photography platform and wins commissions from corporations as large as airlines to shoot events and put images of their [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/oSGUISRpod8/making-money-with-instagram

bird photography

Green

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/vuzlG/~3/CsfPCKbwN8Q/green.html

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Tampa Cop Watch Activist Wins $20,000 Settlement

A Tampa man who was arrested last year on wiretapping charges for video recording cops just won a $20,000 settlement.

William Kilgore also had an incident earlier this year where Pinellas County Sheriff’s deputy Mike Smalley ripped a camera out of his hand and damaged it.

And just by coincidence, I happened to run into William Kilgore today as I was walking around Tampa outside the Republican National Convention.

So I’ll let him explain it as I am heading out to dinner at this moment. But be sure to check out his Youtube channel.


Please send stories, tips and videos to carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com.

CARLOS MILLER'S LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

I am immersed in a legal case where I not only want to clear my criminal charges stemming from my arrest in January, but I want to sue the Miami-Dade Police Department for deleting my footage, which I was able to recover.

My goal is to set some type of precedent to ensure this does not happen as often as it does today where cops simply get away with it.

So if you would like to contribute, please click on the "donate" button below and contribute whatever you can afford.

Facebook PINAC Page

You can keep up with my stories by friending me on Facebook or following me on Twitter and/or Google + or by liking the PINAC Facebook page.

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Hair Transplant 

Also, in an unrelated PINAC matter, I recently went through a hair transplant operation and I'm documenting my recovery on this blog if you are interested. I did not pay for this transplant, which is why I'm promoting the doctor through the hair transplant blog.

Source: http://www.pixiq.com/article/tampa-cop-watch-activist-wins-20000-settlement

wildlife photographer

Sled Dog Ride

Riding on a dog sled, Punch Bowl Glacier, Chugach National Forest, Alaska. Dog sledding in the summer – crazy!� This was earlier this month near Girdwood.� I think you can see another team off in the distance.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/5kKB1wyeOC8/sled-dog-ride

lens for wildlife photography

Wednesday, 29 August 2012

Canon C100 - a video camera aimed at solo videographers

Canon's push into film-making continues with today's announcement of the C100, it's 'entry level' camera in its Cinema range.

The C100 is very much a scaled-down C300 aimed at people who film solo or are just dipping their toes into the Cinema range. For a start, it's roughly 15% smaller than the C300. Then there are the features such as the One Shot AF button to check focus, the Push Auto Iris function that allows filmers to evaluate exposure and make adjustments before shooting, and an Auto White Balance function (although it can be adjusted manually using the joystick), that are there to make life as easy as possible.

There's a graphical user interface on a vari-angle LCD screen and Gamma settings can be tuned on-screen using the camera's ‘before’ and ‘after’ curves. All recording buttons feature red markings to make them easy to identify, 15 buttons on the camera are customisable, and there are two SD cards slots that can be used simultaneously or in relay.

And of course, it has an EF mount, so anyone who has already been shooting on Canon EOS cameras can continue to use their lenses. It's an easy progression for videographers who cut their teeth on dSLRs to continue with dedicated video cameras.

The other key specs?

  • 8.3MP Super 35mm CMOS sensor

  • 1920×1080 (full HD) recording

  • 24/25/30p and 50/60i frame rates
  • ISO 320 to 20,000

  • 24Mbps AVCHD to SD cards

  • Canon Log Gamma

  • Professional audio

There hasn't been a mention of price or availability yet, although I've heard rumours of $8000. But that is a rumour.


More recent news...

  1. The ultimate pancake lens? (28 August 2012)
  2. The weekly round-up (27 August 2012)
  3. Pentax X-5: 26× zoom and powered by AA batteries (23 August 2012)
  4. Android platforms, mirrored finishes, and tiny sensors: Nikon's newest compacts (22 August 2012)
  5. Canon's made 80 million EF lenses (21 August 2012)

© Daniela Bowker. This article has been licensed for use on Pixiq only. Please do not reproduce wholly or in part without a licence.

Source: http://www.pixiq.com/article/canon-c100-announcement

national history museum wildlife photography

Chincoteague NWR, VA pt2

From http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

What's neat about shooting at Chincoteague is getting to see some new behavior.

On a previous trip I was watching the herons and egrets and noticed how the gulls group up with them. The gulls don't seem to bother the herons and egrets much but they do key off of them - some times stealing their catch. What was interesting to watch though was how the gulls imitate the snowy egrets. The egrets will use their feet to stir up the bottom and get critters to reveal themselves. I saw a gull using its feet in the same way, it had to have learned it from the herons and egrets.

Shooting across from the visitors center out near the beach is surprisingly good. I would have thought the traffic or other visitors might detract, but it worked well.



I have this low LL Bean chair, it sits about 4 inches off the ground and makes for a nice seat to use and stay low, and off the sometimes wet/muddy ground.



One thing that I try to avoid is shooting from head high, tripod high, for no reason. Often I will collapse the legs on my tripod to the shortest height and then sit down, or I will extend the legs just slightly and kneel or crouch. I've only gone in to a full horizontal shooting stance a few times, but getting that low makes a difference. The two main things are the angle is more intimate, being closer to the subject, and the other thing it does is makes me less imposing - so I am not towering over a 1 feet subject standing 6 feet tall. Staying low can make a big difference like this. A couple of trips about at Chincoteague I slid closer to a group of herons and got within 20 or 25 feet of them. THey knew I was there but over time I slowly got closer and didn't trigger their fear and they stayed put, hunting, unbothered. When I was done shooting and stood up - every bird flew away. Many came back as I walked away, but that just shows the contrast of standing vs. sitting and the way birds might respond.

This Redish Egret had just caught and ate a crab - and then proceeded to stick its head underwater so it could slowly look for the other bits (legs and claws). It was neat to see and the undisturbed water made for some nice reflections...

Chincoteague NWR, VA





Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/09/chincoteague-nwr-va-pt2.html

long exposure photography

Brown Hares lepus europaeus in the Scottish Borders

I’m not a fan of this time of year simply because it’s difficult to see the wildlife. All the trees are in full leaf, all the grass areas are at their peak with grasses and wildflowers growing very tall and … Continue reading

Source: http://www.wildlife-photography.uk.com/blog/?p=7151&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=brown-hares-lepus-europaeus-in-the-scottish-borders

wildlife photography uk

Landscape Photo Contest 2012

Update. This contest is now closed.
The second competition in our 2012 photo contest series is now open for entries! The theme is ?Landscapes?. We are looking for striking, original and beautiful landscape photographs taken anywhere in the world. For some inspiration, checkout the results of last year’s Landscape Photo Contest. The deadline for this contest [...]

Source: http://blog.burrard-lucas.com/2012/04/landscape-photo-contest-2012/

landscape photography

Puffballs, part II

Continuing with my puffball adventures, we move from the behemoth to the dwarf. These next mushrooms that I'm about to share are VERY small compared to the large puffballs from my last post. I would gauge these little guys to be around 1/50th the size of that huge puffball that was at least as big as my shoe.

At first glance, you might mistake them for a bunch of nuts on the forest floor. Perhaps we have stumbled upon a squirrel's not-so-secret stash of acorns?


Upon closer inspection it becomes apparent, though, that they are stacked a little TOO neatly to be nuts. Indeed these are mushrooms, and as far as I can tell, they fall into the puffball category.


While most were found existing only in large clusters, a few were visible singly or in pairs. I should have put something next to these to give you an idea of their size, but I would describe them as being as large as a cherry tomato. While I cannot claim with much certainty their identity, I am inclined to say these are probably the pear-shaped puffball, Lycoperdon pyriforme, a species that is known for growing in clusters.




Mushrooms may be one of the easiest subjects to photograph in nature. They are photogenic, they don't fly or walk away from you, and rarely do they blow in the wind. A nice stationary subject, not something you come across very often in nature photography!



I hope you've enjoyed this look into the world of puffballs. I will admit that I know very little about mushrooms and fungi, but the more I photograph them, the more my interest becomes piqued. One more item to add to my list of things to learn about!

Source: http://heather-heatherofthehills.blogspot.com/2011/12/puffballs-part-ii.html

photography career

Sled Dog Ride

Riding on a dog sled, Punch Bowl Glacier, Chugach National Forest, Alaska. Dog sledding in the summer – crazy!� This was earlier this month near Girdwood.� I think you can see another team off in the distance.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/5kKB1wyeOC8/sled-dog-ride

best camera for wildlife photography

YouTube Fails to Bring Sales for Photographers

When you?re looking to sell photography services, you know you?re going to need a website ? and ideally one that?s free of Flash, easy to browse and contains an impressive but select portfolio. You might also want a Facebook page, either for advertising or as a way to stay in touch with previous clients. But [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/55n-WWcr51M/youtube-fails-to-bring-sales-for-photographers

photography for beginners

The African Wild Cat

title=
There’s something special about being in a game reserve and seeing the big cats like lions, leopards and cheetahs and then coming across a little African wild cat.� Wild cats look so much like domestic cats that it’s hard to believe that they aren’t the tame, lovable creatures that rule our hearts and homes.� Although [...]

Source: http://www.wilkinsonsworld.com/2012/08/the-african-wild-cat/

fine art photography

Tuesday, 28 August 2012

It's DIY Thursday

Fancy yourself a bit of a ? modder?

You're not the only one. In fact, of the ~10,000 people who arrive at Strobist via a Google search on a given day, many of them are looking for a specific DIY solution.

Today, the top ten searched for DIY projects on Strobist?and how practical it is to attempt each of them... Read more �

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/07/fancy-yourself-bit-of-modder-youre-not.html

wildlife photography courses

Birds of Periyar I

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/vuzlG/~3/2cgjVIAiKXY/birds-of-periyar-i.html

photography basics

Swan Lake

A pair of swans, Chugach National Forest, Alaska. This was from last night not far from my home.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/WPcZ8g37Jzw/swan-lake

best lenses for wildlife photography

Three Amigos!

Three brown bears cubs, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska. These three were so much fun to watch and photograph!

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/W-q8qdeTPZ0/three-amigos

animal photography

Birdfair Rutland Water

I would just like to thank everyone who came to say hello at the Birdfair last week, I was surprised to see so may of my blog followers attended this great event and in particular those of you who came … Continue reading

Source: http://www.wildlife-photography.uk.com/blog/?p=7159&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=birdfair-rutland-water

photography university courses

Puffballs, part II

Continuing with my puffball adventures, we move from the behemoth to the dwarf. These next mushrooms that I'm about to share are VERY small compared to the large puffballs from my last post. I would gauge these little guys to be around 1/50th the size of that huge puffball that was at least as big as my shoe.

At first glance, you might mistake them for a bunch of nuts on the forest floor. Perhaps we have stumbled upon a squirrel's not-so-secret stash of acorns?


Upon closer inspection it becomes apparent, though, that they are stacked a little TOO neatly to be nuts. Indeed these are mushrooms, and as far as I can tell, they fall into the puffball category.


While most were found existing only in large clusters, a few were visible singly or in pairs. I should have put something next to these to give you an idea of their size, but I would describe them as being as large as a cherry tomato. While I cannot claim with much certainty their identity, I am inclined to say these are probably the pear-shaped puffball, Lycoperdon pyriforme, a species that is known for growing in clusters.




Mushrooms may be one of the easiest subjects to photograph in nature. They are photogenic, they don't fly or walk away from you, and rarely do they blow in the wind. A nice stationary subject, not something you come across very often in nature photography!



I hope you've enjoyed this look into the world of puffballs. I will admit that I know very little about mushrooms and fungi, but the more I photograph them, the more my interest becomes piqued. One more item to add to my list of things to learn about!

Source: http://heather-heatherofthehills.blogspot.com/2011/12/puffballs-part-ii.html

3d photography

Observe and be Judgmental

From - http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

I think to be a successful nature/wildlife photographer you have to be judgmental! What do I mean by that? Well here goes...

To make animal photos that are more than snapshots, more than an "oh look, click!" type of photo it takes skill in observation. It takes time to see and think like the subject. To make predictions and try to either put yourself in the right spot at the right time or to let something play out the way you would like.

In my recent shooting of the osprey nest here in Maryland I've noticed a few things, and tried a few things, and had pretty good luck.

read more...

3 Osprey Chicks on a hot day
The first time I visited this nest, was a couple or more months ago when the female was on eggs, so no chicks yet. What I noticed was the nest was super close to land. Having seen a nest or two that was too close for the bird's comfort I was excited and a bit cautious. I decided to wait to come back. And by the time I came back again 2 of the 3 chicks were fledged.

MD Osprey 2010
When I got there a walked up near the nest, and got the usual yips from the chicks and more from the mom. After a minute she calmed down, and I also backed off a bit. After that and a little time it almost became hard to get a reaction from them. I didn't want to them to fly off the nest or anything, it was just odd that they didn't care so much, even if I was pretty close.

It was then that I knew they were used to people being in the area and while aware of it all, they could deal with it well. Later visits I'd get close, back off, other people would come by or a boat or a plane and the additional activity might make them fly.

Judging the circumstances and their behavior - on more than one occasion I backed away from the nest and sat down, or generally looked away did my thing to let them watch and come back to the nest, and not be bothered by my presence. This tactic worked.

MD Osprey 2010
If you've watch an osprey nest you are probably aware that the adults are big and can take care of themselves well, be it a crow or an eagle, or another osprey that is a threat. But they can also be skittish and fly away from the nest if bothered or not come back if a person is too close.

Sleepy Chicks and Vigil Mom
I've watched that series "In to the lions den" and I think a lot can be learned from it. The guys approach is to be super observant and to build awareness of animal behavior. Then to take that knowledge and try to build trust with the animals so you can come to a common ground where you just are there, and they don't get bothered by his presence. In the show he used this technique to go from roaring lions at 150 yards, to laying down on the ground unprotected at around 15 feet from the pride!

While I'm not him, and these aren't lions, observing osprey and trying to make all kinds of judgments as to their thoughts and your actions has led to some great chances at photographs.

This particular location is odd and great in that the birds are close and NOT bothered by people that much. They've become habituated to people being in the area. And the calmness of the adults has carried over to the chicks. This weekend the 3rd chick fledged (or had just done so the day before). Using past experience I'd say that birds which aren't comfortable - that can fly away - will fly away if bothered. This weekend the birds didn't fly away due to me being there at all I think. I even got as close as the shore would allow, and got the occasional stare but not much else.

Then came the male. I hadn't seen him all that much. In the week or so of observation I'd been wanting to see all 5 birds (2 adults and 3 chicks). When the male visited late in the day, he flew by and buzzed the nest and fly off. Having seen this same skittishness in the male from a different nest I watched last year, I backed off and waited and within a few minutes he came back and delivered a fish.



Last year when I saw this skittishness I tried to avoid taking shots after that first fly by on the nest. Holding off worked sometimes but he was still skittish. And this testing it out on my part was difficult at times because I wasn't the only photographer there. The other guys did try it too and it seemed to help but the birds were uneasy and with multiple people it is a hard thing to control and gain insight from. Imagine if that Lion guy was trying to get to be friends with a lion pride and was doing it while part of a group of 3 people!?@

This weekend when the male flew by I took the initial shots of him flying, backed off/away and he came back. Then he went and caught more fish and I repeated the same thing but moved off quicker and he came back quicker too.

Be Judgmental

The point of this is to be observant, be in the moment, watch for signs of discomfort in subjects and possible causes which you might control - like movement, distance from subject, noise you're making, etc. Animals will give signs of their comfort or lack there of, and often will do it before they are ready to fly away.

Watching nests can be pretty easy as a photographer, and pretty stressful on the birds if you get too close or don't watch for the signs and respond to them. It is a common things for birds to abandon eggs or even young chicks if they're bothered. When approached properly though getting to see the variety of behavior and interactions between adults and offspring can be very rewarding.

--

As a photographer I like to be thoughtful and question my own actions. I also like to watch others and then wonder to myself if I'd do it the same way or differently given the chance. To get close and get close photos takes more than a long lens. It takes time to observe and learn, and time to experiment and to try again and again.

This spring I spent more than a couple days hunting around for the new perfect spot to try to shoot osprey. I had two in mind and my fall back spot turned in to the better one. In a couple evenings and a couple afternoons I shot around 60GBs of stuff (osprey and a couple green herons). I'm going to try to go back and get more of the adults and especially the chicks fishing. I've seen 1 or 2 of the chicks hunting and been surprised how clumsy they are, but how well they do too.

Osprey Learning to Fish, Fish Learning to Fly

Make plans! Summer will be wrapping up before you know it and Fall migration will be upon us. What will you do to see better things, take better photos and make this Fall your best? I'm going to visit some new spots, as well as some spots that were new to me last year.

Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/07/observe-and-be-judgmental.html

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