Monday, 31 December 2012

Winter Reads: Winters Reads


What's better than a new book from Dan Winters? Try two new books from Dan Winters.

Both are gorgeous; both are limited press runs. So if you delayed getting your copy of his Periodicals book before it went out of print, don't miss out this time.

Short version: Last Launch is a love letter to the recently closed space shuttle program; Dan Winters's America is like having a one-man exhibition on your coffee table.

More, and pics, inside. Read more �

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/11/winter-reads-winters-reads.html

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Don't use the focus limiter feature of long lenses

From http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

There was a time that I always used the limiter. Now pretty much never.

Green Heron w/ fish

This guy wouldn't let me approach close at all. If I tried to walk towards him he'd fly away at 50 feet! After that happening twice, the next time I saw him at more than 50 feet, I laid down and waited for him to come to me and he did. The above is at about 40 feet. He got to inside of 10.

One of the reasons I now do not use the focus limiter at all on my telephoto lenses is that shots of far away stuff is easy, and I want close stuff. When the close stuff presents itself I do not want to be fumbling over a limiter switch. It makes the lens hunt more, or spend more time hunting through the range of focus - but it is one of the things I've changed in my approach to focus in the last year. I'd much rather miss the far away stuff than the close stuff.

With birds close often happens in just a few wing beats. For the above I was prone and trying to balance the lens, not show myself to the heron, and keep shooting as he kept getting closer and closer...

There's nothing much more frustrating then hoping and trying for close encounters and then having the camera or lens get in the way of taking those close photos...

FB / twitter

--50--
Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/07/dont-use-focus-limiter-feature-of-long.html

photography for beginners

I?m moving to Africa!

I have some exciting news… I am moving to Zambia!
I am going to be spending the next year travelling around Zambia and some of the neighbouring countries. I am looking forward to getting stuck in to some serious, in-depth photography projects!

While I’m away I will be updating my blog with my latest adventures. You can [...]

Source: http://blog.burrard-lucas.com/2012/08/im-moving-to-africa/

still life photography

Chincoteague NWR, Fall 2010

From: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

A couple weeks ago I had my most productive visit to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.

The thing that set the visit apart was the morning encounters I had with some herons and egrets.

Egrets on OrangeSome Light

Golden Snowy

Color and good light makes normal things special, and great things extra special.

I've taken lots of heron and egret photos but really just about none when there was such magical light. Two things combined - the sun was rising behind me a bit, and there was a touch of fall foliage in front of me. The two combined to bathe these birds in light and color.

MondayCatch and Release

Half a Great Egret, and a Full Snowy Egret

Shooting at Chincoteague can be a little tough, mostly because lots of people go there, and they are often tourist types that see someone or some thing and stop and all get out at once. On the day I got these shots that happened a couple times and I left and came back hoping the birds that all flew away would come back - and it sort of worked.

While there I also saw the roughly 1000 snow geese, and a few skimmers, hawks, falcons and some shovelers and other ducks...

Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/11/chincoteague-nwr-fall-2010.html

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No Thrush Rush, But A Belgian Treat

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Out on Rawcliffe Moss at 0650 I?d set the nets in the dark again, leaving me time to grab a coffee before the hoped for arrival of thrushes. Nothing much happened, just a quiet morning and a smattering of birds at first light followed in the next hour or two by a steady passage of Lesser Redpolls with smaller numbers of Chaffinches.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/gaSPiAvhVpw/no-thrush-rush-but-belgian-treat.html

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As tough as ?. a Honey badger

Nature
I thought I would lighten up a bit after blogging twice about the killing and culling that takes place in nature in Africa.� Time for a change and something different.� We traveled extensively in Botswana in August/September and spent a few days in the Central Kalahari revisiting Passarge Valley for a couple of days.� When [...]

Source: http://www.wilkinsonsworld.com/2012/11/as-tough-as-a-honey-badger/

photography school

Night in Bangalore

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/vuzlG/~3/1ROHTmt9i6k/night-in-bangalore.html

wildlife nature photography

Dead Water Snakes

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/vuzlG/~3/VZvSirM758Q/dead-water-snakes.html

food photographers

Sunday, 30 December 2012

iPhone Photos That Sell

It?s not the camera, it?s the photographer that makes the picture. That?s what photographers are always told ? and what the successful ones always say ? and it?s particularly true for anyone trying to take pictures on an iPhone. Although the latest model, with its new optics and 8 megapixel lens is a big improvement [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/dxxPWL1YAoc/iphone-photos-that-sell

photography for beginners

Making Pinterest Work for Photographers

Photographers have good reason to despise social media?s new golden platform but Pinterest is visual, viral and too big to ignore. In December 2011, Pinterest achieved a landmark. The site drove more traffic to retailers than LinkedIn, YouTube or Google Plus. With two of those services supported by the Internet?s biggest company, that was some [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/p3y2fFbnmdo/making-pinterest-work-for-photographers

portrait photography tips

Riverside

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/vuzlG/~3/Hz27RLRhAo8/riverside.html

photographers gallery

2012-10-21 20:50:44

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Grey Sky Hares Its been an quiet year for hares but then again it has been a very strange year for weather.I have certainly struggled to get any photographs of them in sunlight but then when it shines soinfrequently it is not particularly surprising that its unlikely to coincide with my visits.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/gEKbe0T7t8A/grey-sky-hares-its-been-quiet-year-for.html

photography portfolios

What Marissa Mayer Should Do to Make Flickr Awesome (again)

It didn?t take long for the appointment of Google executive Marissa Mayer as Yahoo CEO to ignite hope in the hearts of Flickr lovers everywhere. Entrepreneur Sean Bonner bought www.dearmarissamayer.com and used the domain to appeal not for a more friendly Yahoo Mail or for a better search facility but for a better photo-sharing site. [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/d9Zs4uWEtTc/marissa-mayer-flickr

landscape photography tips

Red Squirrel Sciurus vulgaris Northumberland

I had an opportunity to visit a private site to hopefully get some images of the delightful red squirrel. The weather was abysmal with heavy rain and the light ranging from poor to terrible causing a few exposure problems, but … Continue reading

Source: http://www.wildlife-photography.uk.com/blog/?p=7445&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=red-squirrel-sciurus-vulgaris-northumberland

stock photography

George McGovern taught me about politics

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When I was 16, this poster hung on my bedroom door for about a year. I know that drove my dad nuts. I was learning about politics, but clearly didn't understand it.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/ZZ4UAmm8cDI/george-mcgovern-taught-me-about-politics.html

wildlife photography

Chaparral Ornaments

Bigberry manzanita blossoms from today's Christmas Day run to Saddle Peak from Cold Creek.

Related post: Calabasas Peak From Saddle Peak



PhotographyontheRun.com Copyright 2006-2012 Gary Valle. All Rights Reserved.

Source: http://www.photographyontherun.com/ChaparralOrnaments.aspx

wildlife photographers

Saturday, 29 December 2012

M4: Like the Carbine, But With More Power


About this time last Friday I was in head-scratching mode, trying to figure out my light. Here was the challenge:

Teeny-tiny stage. Twenty three insane performers. No room to change shooting positions. Complex, low-level and fast-changing ambient.

I had been looking forward to it for weeks. Because I was getting to photograph MarchFourth, my absolute favorite band in the world. Lighting, pics and video, inside? Read more �

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/11/m4-like-carbine-but-with-more-power.html

studio photography

H�sten 2012

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Tenkte det var p� tide � komme med en liten bloggoppdatering, da jeg ser det er en god stund siden sist. �rsaken til dette er vel enkelt og greit at det ikke har skjedd s� mye p� fotofronten.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/J7KleL6FTkI/hsten-2012_21.html

photography gifts

No Snow in Sight!

View to the ocean from Eagle Rock in the Santa Monica Mountains

Well, actually you could see some snow on Mt. Baldy and the higher peaks of the San Gabriel Mountains, but that snow was 50 miles away. So far there had been a little frost in the shadows and mud in the low spots of the fire roads of Topanga State Park, but not a patch of snow in sight.

Lynn & Frank were heading back to the land of rain and snow for Christmas and there WAS snow on their local trails. More snow and bone-chilling temps were in the forecast, and a long snow-free run in the Santa Monica Mountains was a great way to celebrate the holidays!

We had taken a detour from the Backbone Trail to the top of Eagle Rock. After enjoying the view we would extend the detour down the Musch Trail and pick up the Backbone Trail at Trippet Ranch. From Trippet we would follow the Backbone Trail down into Topanga Canyon, up Hondo Canyon, over to Saddle Peak and then down to Malibu Canyon.

With a couple of short side trips the distance from the End of Reseda (Marvin Braude Mulholland Gateway Park) worked out to about 21 miles. The distance and elevation gain were about the same as last Saturday's run -- also on the Backbone Trail.

Related post: July Fourth Trail Run to Trippet Ranch, Hondo Canyon and Saddle Peak



PhotographyontheRun.com Copyright 2006-2012 Gary Valle. All Rights Reserved.

Source: http://www.photographyontherun.com/NoSnowInSight.aspx

photography portfolio

2013 Photo Tour / Workshop Update

A Humpback Whale dives at sunset, Inside Passage, Southeast, Alaska. Since I take off this weekend, I thought I would provide an update for next years photo tours and workshops.� I think by the time I get back from Antarctica that they may all be full.� Here is the latest: January – Antarctica with Cheeseman’s� [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/ovUdTVHB3X4/2013-photo-tour-workshop-update

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A special owl on a special day

Remember a few posts back when I showed you a cute, tiny owl? I said I could have taken it home in my pocket, and estimated that it was smaller in size than my head.

A captive Northern Saw-whet Owl who is part of the educational display for the Back to the Wild wildlife rehabilitation center.

This past Friday, I finally got a chance to meet one of these little cuties up close. But let's back up a little bit.

I had never even heard of Saw-whet Owls until last spring. It was at the ODNR's annual Wildlife Diversity conference that I heard a presentation about Saw-whet Owls given by Kelly Williams-Sieg, an Ohio University grad student and licensed bird bander. The presentation detailed her work with Project Owlnet and how she's been banding and researching Saw-whets (and other birds) since 2004 at Earl H. Barnhart Buzzards Roost Nature Preserve in Chillicothe, Ohio. As her presentation wrapped up, I jotted down some notes and thought, "Wow, wouldn't it be cool to attend one of these banding sessions?" I left it at that, thinking it a purely whimsical notion at the time. Fast forward 6 months or so to an event at Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area, where Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalists met for a weekend of pure nature bliss, full of learning about and looking at birds, butterflies, flowers and beetles. It was here that I met Bob Scott Placer, a licensed bird bander, who also happens to live practically down the street from me. Bob has been helping Kelly band owls at Buzzards Roost from day one. After some discussions with Bob, I went out to Buzzards Roost once last year to check out the banding operation, but we struck out. It was early December, and they hadn't seen any Saw-whets for a week or so. Bob advised that we come in early November the next year for better luck.

And so we did just that. There was no pressure to see an owl or anything. It just so happened to be my birthday on the day that I chose for our owling adventure.

A group of folks from the Scioto Valley Bird and Nature Club was already there by the time we arrived around 8:15 pm. Kelly, Bob and Lisa, our banders for the evening, made several checks of the mist nets between 8:30 and 10:15, each time coming up empty-handed. By 10:30 all the bird club folks had headed home, so Dave and I were the only onlookers left. Around 10:45 the nets were checked, and still there was nothing. Bob said that during previous banding sessions so far this season the owls had been showing up pretty late, so we all hung in there for one more net check at 11:15. Lo and behold, Kelly checked a net and said she had an owl. I let out a small squeal of delight and rushed down to see for myself. Kelly deftly but gently untangled the owl from the net. It clacked its beak several times, a sound of warning. We heard plenty more of that as our time with the owl went on.


Kelly Williams-Sieg and Bob Scott Placier prepare to collect data from a Northern Saw-whet Owl.

Once the owl was freed from the mist netting, we brought it inside to band it and collect various data, such as wing and tail length, weight, and amount of fat observed.

Kelly blows the owl's feathers out of the way so she can look for fat deposits under its skin. This bird showed no fat deposits, which is typical of a bird that is in the middle of migration. Kelly also showed me how she feels along either side of the breast bone for fat, and let me feel for myself.



Kelly demonstrates how a Saw-whet bite doesn't hurt. That hooked beak looks intimidating, but that's mainly a tool for ripping the flesh of its prey. The real danger on this little predator is its talons, which Kelly experienced first-hand several times over the course of several minutes.


Normally docile and seemingly tame in the hand, this Saw-whet was an exception to the rule. She was feisty right from the start, complete with lots of bill snapping and much kicking and grabbing with those talons. Here Lisa gives the owl a momentary distraction of a pencil to hang on to while Kelly tries to reposition her for more data collection.


Taking the tail measurement. I think the owl has a most displeased expression here.


For those of you wondering how you weigh an owl (or any other small bird), this is how it's done. They go head-first into some kind of tube, which keeps them from wiggling around too much. This Saw-whet weighed in at 98.2 grams, which Kelly said was on the high side for this species. The weight, combined with tail and wing measurements suggests that this owl is a female (typically, female owls are larger than the males).


A black light is used to help age the bird. There is a certain pigment in the owls flight feathers that show up in varying degrees of pink, depending on its age. This photo doesn't do the test justice because the whole bird shows up as pink, which is not what we really saw. Based on the amount of pink we saw, and how bright the pink was, Kelly determined that this owl was born this year. That's called a hatch-year bird. So we had ourselves a fiesty, hatch-year female.


Now that we've got her vitals, let enjoy her cuteness, shall we?


Rock, paper, scissors, owl! Just kidding. Kelly's showing me how to hold my fingers as I prepare to get the best birthday present a birder could ask for...


... A loving gaze from a teeny, tiny owl. Say it with me everyone: Awwwwwwwwww.


Despite all the attitude and the feistyness, this little ball of fluff could not resist the power of a good head rub. I have read about this phenomenon from others, and she did indeed just keep pushing her head back farther and farther as I ran my finger down her head and back. She did show some signs of resistance though, as she simultaneously pushed into the head rub while snapping her bill half-heartedly. The theory behind what seems to be the owl's enjoyment of this action is that it reminds them of mutual grooming and preening that they do in the wild (especially mother with owlet).


One last pose with "my" owl before we took her outside to be released.

It took a few minutes for us to walk down to the spot where we released her, which gave her eyes time to adjust to the dark enough so that she could see to fly off to a nearby perch. Kelly placed her on my arm, and I had a feeling it wouldn't take her too long to fly off, given all the attitude she had given us while in our care. Sure enough, she took off within 5 seconds, wooshing over my head into a tree just behind me. Luckily I was able to turn around fast enough to see her outstretched wings back-lit against a sky brightened by a waning moon just before she landed.

All in all, I'd say that experience was a pretty cool birthday present. Thank you Kelly, Bob and Lisa. And thank you, little owl. I was very honored to meet you.

But wait, don't go away yet! Please be sure to check out THIS ARTICLE from the October 2008 issue of Ohio Magazine that goes into a little more detail about the Saw-whet banding project. And to see the banding process in action, watch THIS VIDEO by ODNR's Division of Wildlife.

Source: http://heather-heatherofthehills.blogspot.com/2011/11/special-owl-on-special-day.html

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Winter

Some more Alaska Winter.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/IAcyT-R5la4/winter

wildlife photographer of the year

Cape May - Skimmers and Light

From http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/


Cape May is a hot spot for bird watching during fall migration. The way the state tapers off to the cape/point of New Jersey acts like a funnel where birds follow the land south and end up there, running out of coast/land and then momentarily stuck to think it over.

According to the local bird watchers who are in the know, approximately 80% of the birds that pass through the cape are immature/juvenile birds. The main reason being it is easier to migrate south 100% over land, avoiding the Delaware Bay and the water crossing. Adults know enough to take the easier inland route, while the first year birds don't. These young ones can cross but they have to stop and think about it, and then muster up the courage to make the trip over the open water.

In 2009 I made a couple trips to Cape May and this year I did 6 or 7 trips (multiple days each trip). The migrating hawks and falcons, and little birds / song birds (passerines) are most people's favorites. And they are mine too, except for the black skimmers, they are so fun to watch, and offer such great chances.

Skimmers

Last year I shot the skimmers a lot at sunrise and sunset and this year I did the same. Trying to get the flock and some nice light together is what makes them extra special. The skimmers might sit on the beach most of the day doing next to nothing, but around sunrise and sunset they are full of action.

Rise and Shine

As the fall season passes most of the early skimmers to leave are mature ones. By November the flock of black skimmers in Cape May is mainly juvenile birds.

Skimmer Sunrise


Birds of Prey
This year I finally got to experience what the big big push of birds is like - seeing hawks and falcons on the frequency of seconds, not minutes or hours. Seriously. All this year it was just a couple of the days I was there, and one especially, when the action was just crazy.

The best days I had were a day or two after a storm passed through, with the backside of the weather creating winds out of the ~west which groups up the migrating birds along the coast. Perfect.

Sharpie w/ bulging cropKestrel w/ Dragonfly

Next year I am going to visit lots again, and I will try to focus more on the migrating birds of pray. It is (too) easy to split time between them and the skimmers. Most of my visits this year were in October, and next year I am going to go a bit more earlier.

--50--
Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/11/cape-may-skimmers-and-light.html

learn photography

31 Day of Halloween Photos #20

31 days of Halloween Photos #20 (c) Misty DawnS Participating in SOOC Sunday

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/wpcXChtSxS0/31-day-of-halloween-photos-20.html

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Friday, 28 December 2012

Sunday birds.

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Thankfully I completely disregarded the weather forecast this morning and went out to look for some birds. The weather was on my side (all day!) and the dogs and I had a nice walk at Kelley Point Park and then another at Force Lake.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/THooSMmA0iM/sunday-birds.html

3d photography

Chaparral Ornaments

Bigberry manzanita blossoms from today's Christmas Day run to Saddle Peak from Cold Creek.

Related post: Calabasas Peak From Saddle Peak



PhotographyontheRun.com Copyright 2006-2012 Gary Valle. All Rights Reserved.

Source: http://www.photographyontherun.com/ChaparralOrnaments.aspx

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Chincoteague NWR, Fall 2010

From: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

A couple weeks ago I had my most productive visit to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.

The thing that set the visit apart was the morning encounters I had with some herons and egrets.

Egrets on OrangeSome Light

Golden Snowy

Color and good light makes normal things special, and great things extra special.

I've taken lots of heron and egret photos but really just about none when there was such magical light. Two things combined - the sun was rising behind me a bit, and there was a touch of fall foliage in front of me. The two combined to bathe these birds in light and color.

MondayCatch and Release

Half a Great Egret, and a Full Snowy Egret

Shooting at Chincoteague can be a little tough, mostly because lots of people go there, and they are often tourist types that see someone or some thing and stop and all get out at once. On the day I got these shots that happened a couple times and I left and came back hoping the birds that all flew away would come back - and it sort of worked.

While there I also saw the roughly 1000 snow geese, and a few skimmers, hawks, falcons and some shovelers and other ducks...

Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/11/chincoteague-nwr-fall-2010.html

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