Tuesday, 15 January 2013

As Fotolia Buys Wilogo, Does Spec Work Beat Microstock?

Since Getty bought iStock in 2006 for $50 million, we?ve been used to seeing stock giants snapping up their smaller rivals. At least one of those smaller rivals, though, is also expanding through acquisition. Fotolia, one of the leading microstock sites, has now paid an undisclosed sum for Wilogo, a crowdsourced design firm. Fotolia isn?t [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/VdMtaOWQtZM/as-fotolia-buys-wilogo-does-spec-work-beat-microstock

camera courses

Canoeing Greenbo Lake State Park in Kentucky...with two little stinkpots...

Cool temps and autumn color made this canoein
Last weekend, Rick, Matty and I, my parents, and my brother, sister-in-law and niece headed southeast for an autumn adventure at Greenbo Lake State Park in Kentucky.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/acrY-7e_8Pw/canoeing-greenbo-lake-state-park-in.html

photography portfolio

Monday, 14 January 2013

Eastern Sierra

A photo of the Sierra Nevada mountains from B
A View of the Sierras from Bishop, California I took a trip to the Eastern Sierras recently to shoot fall colors.� I had planned to go since some time in the summer, but I learned of a three-day weekend trip being led by Dave Henry, one of Canon?s Explorers of Light, which was scheduled for the time I planned to be there.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/ni1cQ2JTZ1U/

photography gifts

Red Squirrels at the BWC

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Visiting with the squirrels at the British Wildlife Centre. Photographing a squirrel running at full tilt along the top of the fencing is much harder then photographing a cat jumping over a log, and I never quite managed to get it right.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/jrPI0hfUXr0/281245.html

still life photography

Autumn is slowly arriving............................................ along the River Weaver

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Most of my local trees are still green at the momentso during a lovely boat trip yesterday it was lovely to see the banks of my local river the Weaver at Acton Bridge looking quite autumnal.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/z1herXKG1To/autumn-is-slowly-arriving-along-river.html

photography studio

Tree Creeper Certhia familiaris Scottish Borders

I haven’t seen the tree creeper for some time, and thought it must have come to grief at the hands of a predator. So, I was quite surprised to see it in my garden this afternoon. I grabbed my camera … Continue reading

Source: http://www.wildlife-photography.uk.com/blog/?p=7591&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tree-creeper-certhia-familiaris-scottish-borders

photography tips

Not in a rush anymore

For quite a while I was in a rush. A panic, motivated, rush, to see, shoot, get, photograph, share. I'm not anymore. It took about 4-5 years of that before it really changed.
Fall Colors


So, what was previously a daily task of posting an image, something hopefully grabbing, something cool, is now a weekly, or monthly, or who knows task. I really no longer feel a drive to share. I feel a drive to try to take good images. But not to share, not to 'feed the machine' or keep 'posting to flickr daily'.

I don't know that I am shooting any less. Maybe slightly here or there, but I'm still trying to get out and could be shooting 100's a day, nearly a couple thousand over a weekend when I am at it.

The photo in this post is a foliage shot from Vermont taken a couple years ago. I did not post anything from this trip prior to today.

One of the things I've hoped to do is to shoot during an event, a season, and then share just prior to it when it happens again, say a year or two later. This is now one of those things, I waited about 23 months to finally post some foliage images.


Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2011/09/not-in-rush-anymore.html

studio photography

Make Black and White Wedding Photography Your Unique Sales Point

Photography: Kevin Mullins In the last few years, we?ve seen photographers push unique sales points by offering reportage wedding photography that drops the formals for shots taken on the run, and Trash the Dress photography that gives brides a chance to let their hair down and soak their gown. Kevin Mullins, a British photographer working [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/N7CV6vtYZbc/make-black-and-white-wedding-photography-your-unique-sales-point

nature photography

Ambush Street Studio



Cool street shooting video from French photographer Philippe Echaroux of his pop-up location studio and an array of impromptu subjects.

You pretty much need an entourage to do this, but I love the idea of a background-on-a-stick. Totally gonna steal that one, Philippe...
(Via ISO 1200)

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/11/ambush-street-studio.html

practical photography

Pine Forest at Vagamon

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/vuzlG/~3/ayQjTvwXv6E/pine-forest-at-vagamon.html

photography wildlife

Sunday, 13 January 2013

Birds, Other Animals Being Attacked With Blowguns in the Bronx

People really suck sometimes.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/8vp-1zReMGQ/birds-other-animals-being-attacked-with-blowguns-in-the-bronx.htm

photography websites

Back to Anahuac

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Birds! I took some photos of 'em, again, finally. I spent the last ten days near Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge (nice!). I was working (no camera with me) most of the time, but managed to find a little free time in between and I spent a day when I was done working running around with the camera.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/iLwtB9lyG_A/back-to-anahuac.html

photography course online

Bandit Country II

Rocky Peak Park

February is a busy month for SoCal trail runners. The Ray Miller 50/50 is Saturday, February 2; the Bandit 50K/30K/15K/6K is Sunday, February 17; the XTERRA SoCal Series continues February 3 at Mission Gorge; and the Big Baz Winter Trail Run Series continues on February 2 & 16 at Blue Jay Campground.

Yesterday's run to Mugu Peak included several of the trails on the Ray Miller Course, so this morning I got in some miles on the Bandit trails. The title photo was taken near the high point of the Bandit 50K and 30K courses in Rocky Peak Park.

This year, rather than doing two Chumash - Las Llajas loops, Bandit 50K runners will do a new out and back segment in Tapo Canyon Open Space to Tapo Canyon Rd. Both 50K and 30K runners we'll run up Las Llajas Canyon -- in the distance on the left -- and then up from the old oil field to Rocky Peak Road. After a short downhill Rocky Peak Road climbs to "Fossil Point" the high point of the course.

Here's a Google Earth flyover of the Bandit 30K course, created from a GPS trace of the 2010 race.

Related post: Bandit 50K 2011 Notes



PhotographyontheRun.com Copyright 2006-2012 Gary Valle. All Rights Reserved.

Source: http://www.photographyontherun.com/BanditCountryII.aspx

beginners photography

MD Osprey Chick 2010

From http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

One of the 3 Osprey chicks from the nest in Maryland.

MD Osprey Chick

With this blog post I'm going to show how I edit and crop for effect. Here's the original photo with no cropping and just my base Lightroom import settings. These Lightroom settings include - saturation, whitebalance, and defringe edge correction. I have a preset for the settings I like to use as my own defaults for import. It took me a little while to come up with them, nothing too special, I just got tired of doing the same settings every time. Once these defaults are applied I often tweak them more.



The nest is distracting and the twig on the right meant I needed to crop tight. If I had a longer lens I would have shot tighter...

Levels adjusted to white out the background and contrast added to make the bird's tones stronger.

The feathers around the chicks neck were also sharpened using Unsharp Mask in Photoshop. Generally I do a couple minutes in Lightroom, and then a couple minutes to reduce the image for posting and add the final adjustments like sharpening in Photoshop.

--50--
Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/07/md-osprey-chick-2010.html

photography studios

Turning Over a New Leaf

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The chief beauty about time is that you cannot waste it in advance. The next year, the next day, the next hour are lying ready for you, as perfect, as unspoiled, as if you had never wasted or misapplied a single moment in all your life.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/ExaQoXEpKhM/turning-over-new-leaf.html

photography blogs

The Most Important Facts You Need to Know About Photo Buyers

Breaking into the photography market should be simple: photo editors at magazines, art buyers at ad firms, designers at marketing firms all need images. If you can shoot a beautiful picture that meets one of their needs all you have to do is swap permission to use your photo for a nice, fat check. The [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/DEXqrScVAWo/the-most-important-facts-you-need-to-know-about-photo-buyers

photography books

Fun Photography Courses You?ve Never Considered

Photography courses are meant to improve technique, encourage creativity, and often to increase earnings. These courses might not broaden your professional services but they?re fun, challenging ? and you haven?t thought of them. Wedding photographers might take classes on posing brides and shooting details. Portrait photographers will learn about expression and lighting, and there?s no [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/8D3YP6Bo3d0/fun-photography-courses-youve-never-considered

photography magazine

Creative Color Processing (Part 3/3 ? Tone Curve)

This is Part 3 of a 3-part series on creative color effects in Lightroom. In this article I will explain how to use the Tone Curve tool for creative color effects. In Part 1 of this series I covered white balance. I discussed split toning in Part 2, as well as how to use split [...]

Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips.

Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips.

Creative Color Processing (Part 3/3 – Tone Curve)

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/4c3LmHq3HE0/creative-color-processing-part-33-tone-curve

photography books

Saturday, 12 January 2013

Winter Reads: Painting with Light

Batting second in our lineup of fireside books is Eric Curry's wonderfully comprehensive Painting with Light.

If you have ever wanted to get into light painting but did not know where to start, Curry will take you gently by the hand and lead you into the world of creating beautifully complex pictures like the ones below?
Read more �

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/11/winter-reads-painting-with-light.html

photography websites

Late summer puffballs

Today has been a typical wet, dreary November day. Well, except that the temperatures seem a little above average. Regardless, I am mourning the loss of summer, and have been for a number of weeks. Now would be a good time to go back and reminisce a little. Take a look at some of the cool stuff I found out and about during those verdant, warm, long days.

I would forgive you if you didn't identify this correctly. It's the kind of thing you might not necessarily investigate at close range. Wait, who am I kidding? If you're reading this blog, you probably like getting up close to things in nature! But I would understand if you thought maybe this was a zoomed-in photo of the hide of a giraffe.


I would also understand if you thought this was a close-up of a print of some turkish art. I am reminded of both of these things when I look at these photos.


It is, however, neither of these things. It's a lovely (gigantic!) puffball mushroom. My shoe next to it gives you some idea as to the scale. If there are any mycologists or mycophiles out in the audience who can pin this down to a species, I'd love to hear from you!


Puffball crater


They seemed especially abundant this year, mostly occurring in groupings of 2 or 3 (sometimes more). From afar they all look the same, but up close, you can see how unique each one is.


This grouping caught my fancy. Almost like a family posing for their portrait. I love how there's a line in the middle 'shroom that seems to carry right into the pattern of bottom one.


Ahhh, mushrooms in a field of green with a backdrop of green leaves. I think maybe I can still smell the summer air if I try hard enough...

Source: http://heather-heatherofthehills.blogspot.com/2011/11/late-summer-puffballs.html

sport photography

Always be shooting and creating

From http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

While I will occasionally take a short break from either shooting or posting, I generally like to always be active and shooting and harvesting images.

Chincoteague NWR, VA

This past long weekend I was very active and drove 600 miles plus, and visited 6 different places including 3 refuges, the DC Zoo, Rennfest and Susquehanna River.

I think I must have taken more than 3 or 4 thousand images. Given that amount of shooting it becomes a lot easier to have stuff to work with and find what looks best, what worked well, and process and post something.

Bombay Hook NWR, DE

Part of what keeps me motivated is a desire to always have something new to post and share.

This time of year, in between summer and fall - I am trying to hit as many spots / places as possible to check in with locations and see where they are during the changing seasons. In past years I'd try to make it to a couple locations very frequently and now I am trying to cast a wider net. Going some place super frequently has its benefits as far as learning the location and specifics. But now I am doing more than that, and often will also do over night trips to extend my reach - for example like visiting Chincoteague NWR.

Out on a Limb

I can't wait for fall to kick in to full gear.

-50-



Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/09/always-be-shooting-and-creating.html

photography lessons

Crystal Cove State Park

Another new one from Crystal Cove State Park, California.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/RonNiebruggesPhotoBlog/~3/-_1mdgrP0tQ/crystal-cove-state-park

wildlife photos

Still missing out 18th Oct

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A mostly cloudy morning produced only a slight passage of overhead migrants, conditions haven't been perfect yet, either too much cloud to the north or rain first thing halting any possible movement.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/DUJuB_7OtRY/19464633

bird photography

Mother Nature airs her dirty laundry

I've never been one for pulling pranks on April Fool's Day, and I'm not about to start now. However, after looking at some wildflower photos I took today, I couldn't resist sharing a few images that are joke-worthy all on their own.

One flower that is prolifically in bloom right now is Dutchman's Breeches. Unfortunately, these pendulous pairs of pantaloons can be tricky to photograph. Being white flowers, any imperfections show up very easily, so getting a nice "clean" set of of breeches is somewhat of a challenge. Some fun can be had with the bad shots, though. Due to the way the flowers dangle on the stalk, it's easy to infer the notion of laundry hanging out on the line.


For example, the dingy pair hanging off to the right looks like it was soaked in tea or coffee for a while, and just wouldn't quite come clean. Those stubborn stains!


I call this the "poopy diaper" shot. Shouldn't take too much of a stretch of the imagination to figure out why.

I didn't come away with too many shots of this flower that I particularly liked, but here's one shot where someone got the bleach right and all the pants are clean:

Happy April! Get out there and smell the dirty diapers wildflowers!

Source: http://heather-heatherofthehills.blogspot.com/2012/04/mother-nature-airs-her-dirty-laundry.html

photography career

"The Hole Thing" - A Great Little Primer

"The Hole Thing" is one of the first pinhole books I ever owned. It got me started along a very interesting photographic path. Published in 1974 by Morgan and Morgan, it is a fun, but pretty basic classic for anyone interested in pinhole photography. I love it so much, I bought two copies. BTW a brand new copy of the first edition can set you back more than a few bucks. If you have some money to spend: The Hole Thing : Jim Shull (Paperback, 1974) Otherwise, a good used copy works just as well.

theholething.jpg

Amazon.com: The Hole Thing: A Manual of Pinhole Photography ...

I'll be adding posts about pinhole over the next month or so and until WPPD. http://www.pinholeday.org/

A Pinhole Can Change Your Photography - 2013 WPPD

I talk about pinhole and zone plate photography in my book too. Buy my book here:  Rethinking Digital Photography.



 

 

Source: http://www.pixiq.com/article/the-hole-thing-a-pirmer

digital photography

Porcupine encounter

I recently spent a week up in Michigan, and the primary purpose of my visit was birding. And bird I did, along with a small group of several other folks who signed up for the Birding School hosted by Nettie Bay Lodge in Presque Isle County. But as is often the case when I participate in nature expeditions like this, we often tend to veer off-topic and turn our attention to anything that might turn up and catch our fancy. The leader of our group, Jim McCormac, had been informed of the location of some porcupine dens during his time leading the birding group at Nettie Bay in 2011, and he was eager to share the dens with us this year. You can read more of what Jim had to say in 2011 about the dens and their residents HERE.

I've never seen a porcupine den other than in Jim's photos, so I was excited to make this trip. There were 2 trees within walking distance of each other, but we were satisfied to examine the tree that was closest to the road. The easiest way to find a porcupine den, I would say, is to look for a developing mound of poo at the base of a tree. This indicates a den that has been used for a good number of years. My National Audubon Society Field Guide to Mammals seems to indicate that the tree dens are used primarily during winter months, but if you read Jim's post about the tree den they encountered last year (in late May), there was indeed a porcupine in residence. In addition to using trees for shelter, they will also use crevices and caves.

Most scat I choose to poke at with a stick. This stuff, however, was so dry that I had no qualms holding it in my hand.

Porcupines are strict herbivores, so there's not really much that would make their poo smell bad. In fact, this scat had no real odor to it at all. I have no idea how fresh it was, though, so it's possible that any smell it may have given off had faded long ago.

Yessir, this is what being a naturalist is all about. Not only holding the poo in your hand, but being willing to go on record with a picture that shows that it is, in fact, YOUR hand that is holding it! No snide remarks from the peanut gallery, okay? It doesn't show up well for some reason, but please note the "No Trespassing" sign on the tree. The porcupine, if it was in there, may have been annoyed by us rooting around in its toilet, but we did have permission from the property owner to be there.


Nina got in on the poo exploration, too. Have you ever seen two ladies so happy to be surrounded by scat?


Here's Jim sticking his camera into the entrance hole of the den, in hopes of finding someone home (I haven't yet heard the verdict on that photo), while Nina examines the pile of excreta.

As I mentioned above, porcupines are herbivores, and in addition to feeding on leaves, twigs, and plants such as lupine and clover, they are also fond of tree bark, especially the inner layer of the bark (known as the cambium). Here's an interesting fact presented by the aforementioned Audubon guide to mammals:
"Fond of salt, the Common Porcupine has a great appetite for wooden tool handles that have absorbed human perspiration through use."
Better keep your wooden-handled trowels and shovels locked safely away in the shed if you live in porcupine territory, which covers most of the western United States, almost all of Canada, northern Michigan, and most of Pennsylvania, New York and New England. (Interestingly, there was no mention of how they otherwise work salt into their diet.)

After we had thoroughly exhausted our exploration of the mound of excrement, we set off to look for other things. As luck would have it, though, perhaps our greatest find of the evening was a real live porcupine located in the up-most portion of a small, spindly aspen tree. This quilled creature was nowhere near the den we had investigated, so we did not find the resident of that specific den, but this was still a great sight to behold.

I spotted this "porky" up in the tree, and as we edged closer, we fully expected to see the tree simply bend over under his weight. The tree was smaller in diameter than my arm, and the tree - along with the porcupine - swayed easily in the breeze. After reading up on them, I learned that they are adept climbers, and actually spend a lot of their time in trees, sometimes even resting there during the day (they are primarily nocturnal, or active during the night). They are slow and deliberate in their climbing, as our small group observed. This porcupine would back down the tree a few feet, and then inch back up and return to the spot where he was when we found him. He seemed a bit baffled by our presence at first, but soon forgot about us and began foraging on the leaves of a neighboring aspen tree. He would used his long claws to hook onto a nearby branch and then draw it towards him, at which point he commenced stripping the leaves from their stalks.

We watched him feed for at least 15 minutes, wondering if he would ever come down. He never showed any inclination to descend while we had our eyes on him. Dusk was coming on quickly when we found him, so he was probably just beginning his nightly routine. We were very lucky, indeed, to be able to observe him like this. It's certainly an experience I won't soon forget!

Source: http://heather-heatherofthehills.blogspot.com/2012/05/porcupine-encounter.html

photography agencies

Friday, 11 January 2013

Q&A: Server Room?With Speedlights?

In the comments of last week's server room portrait, reader MeruWarrior (along with several others) asks:

I love the blow-by-blow account. Could this be achieved with just hotshoe flashes?

Short answer: Yes, sort of. But you're gonna have to be willing to "go with the flow" a little with regard to the ambient room light...Read more �

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/10/q-server-roomwith-speedlights.html

photography careers

What Marissa Mayer Should Do to Make Flickr Awesome (again)

It didn?t take long for the appointment of Google executive Marissa Mayer as Yahoo CEO to ignite hope in the hearts of Flickr lovers everywhere. Entrepreneur Sean Bonner bought www.dearmarissamayer.com and used the domain to appeal not for a more friendly Yahoo Mail or for a better search facility but for a better photo-sharing site. [...]

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/PhotopreneurBlog/~3/d9Zs4uWEtTc/marissa-mayer-flickr

photography training

Always be shooting and creating

From http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

While I will occasionally take a short break from either shooting or posting, I generally like to always be active and shooting and harvesting images.

Chincoteague NWR, VA

This past long weekend I was very active and drove 600 miles plus, and visited 6 different places including 3 refuges, the DC Zoo, Rennfest and Susquehanna River.

I think I must have taken more than 3 or 4 thousand images. Given that amount of shooting it becomes a lot easier to have stuff to work with and find what looks best, what worked well, and process and post something.

Bombay Hook NWR, DE

Part of what keeps me motivated is a desire to always have something new to post and share.

This time of year, in between summer and fall - I am trying to hit as many spots / places as possible to check in with locations and see where they are during the changing seasons. In past years I'd try to make it to a couple locations very frequently and now I am trying to cast a wider net. Going some place super frequently has its benefits as far as learning the location and specifics. But now I am doing more than that, and often will also do over night trips to extend my reach - for example like visiting Chincoteague NWR.

Out on a Limb

I can't wait for fall to kick in to full gear.

-50-



Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2010/09/always-be-shooting-and-creating.html

colour photographers

More Publicity?

More Publicity? by julian sawyer - Purbeck Fo
More Publicity? , a photo by julian sawyer - Purbeck Footprints on Flickr. This picture has been used in a brochure for my Purbeck Footprints stuff and was taken at Peveril Point, one of my favourite places.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/RF7nj14kTag/more-publicity.html

free photography competitions

Winter Reads: Painting with Light

Batting second in our lineup of fireside books is Eric Curry's wonderfully comprehensive Painting with Light.

If you have ever wanted to get into light painting but did not know where to start, Curry will take you gently by the hand and lead you into the world of creating beautifully complex pictures like the ones below?
Read more �

Source: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2012/11/winter-reads-painting-with-light.html

wedding photography tips

A Dream Journey Comes True~


For most of my adult life, I have enjoyed the pleasure of several national parks. There have been 3 though, that I had wanted to visit even more than the others.

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Wildlife-Photography-Blogs/~3/Kt2wy0gJH0U/a-dream-journey-comes-true.html

photography books

Speeding

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/blogspot/vuzlG/~3/RzsS6_jDju4/speeding.html

free photography courses

Not in a rush anymore

For quite a while I was in a rush. A panic, motivated, rush, to see, shoot, get, photograph, share. I'm not anymore. It took about 4-5 years of that before it really changed.
Fall Colors


So, what was previously a daily task of posting an image, something hopefully grabbing, something cool, is now a weekly, or monthly, or who knows task. I really no longer feel a drive to share. I feel a drive to try to take good images. But not to share, not to 'feed the machine' or keep 'posting to flickr daily'.

I don't know that I am shooting any less. Maybe slightly here or there, but I'm still trying to get out and could be shooting 100's a day, nearly a couple thousand over a weekend when I am at it.

The photo in this post is a foliage shot from Vermont taken a couple years ago. I did not post anything from this trip prior to today.

One of the things I've hoped to do is to shoot during an event, a season, and then share just prior to it when it happens again, say a year or two later. This is now one of those things, I waited about 23 months to finally post some foliage images.


Nikographer.com / Jon

Source: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/2011/09/not-in-rush-anymore.html

learn photography